Business

Professional speaking is, quite simply, the business of speaking. A professional speaker is not necessarily any better than a public speaker — it's just that a professional speaker is speaking as a business activity.

These Savvies explore the topic of Business in more detail —

Pro Speaker U

Just as you don’t want other people to “steal” your material, you certainly should not use other people’s copyrighted material without their permission. Unfortunately, speakers sometimes break the law without realizing it.

Pro Speaker U

Speakers frequently think of copyrights as a way of protecting their recordings or their books. But there are other important applications of copyright protection.

Pro Speaker U

A copyright notice technically isn’t needed to establish your copyright on your work. Your original work is automatically “yours” from the moment you publish it. However, if someone does copy your original work and then claims ownership of it, it’s easier to prove that you were the original owner of the material if you have marked it with a copyright notice.

Pro Speaker U

Trademarks are another way of protecting intellectual property, and they're frequently used by pro speakers. In this session, you'll explore the two ways of trademarking something.

Pro Speaker U (Publicly accessible)

Pricing your services too high — or, even worse, too low — is a formula for disaster. Learn how to determine the right price for your speeches, products and services.

Pro Speaker U

In future sessions you’ll consider “the obvious” answer to a question, and you'll see why the obvious answer is sometimes completely wrong. For example, my bio says that I’m an engineer by education and a computer geek by vocation. So the “obvious” conclusion is that I love math. Wrong. I hate math.

Pro Speaker U

One of the biggest mistakes that pro speakers can make is to assume that the "obvious" answer is the correct one. As it turns out, when it comes to numbers, the "obvious" answer is not only often not true, it can be horribly wrong!

Pro Speaker U

The previous example is an excellent example of an “obvious truth” that is absolutely wrong. Now let’s apply the “obvious is not always correct” principle to something a bit closer to home for professional speakers — product sales.

Pro Speaker U

What about the objection that even if sales rise, your profits fall? After all, although a “twofer” profit of $6 per sale is better than a “half off” profit of $3 per sale, you’re still better off making $8 per sale when you sell them at their normal retail price, aren’t you?

Pro Speaker U

Let’s summarize what we’ve determined in the example used in the preceding sessions. In this example....

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